A Letter from the President of the Association

February 6, 2021

The Schürch Family Association of North America held a brief meeting today to discuss the problems created by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic as it relates to the Reunion scheduled for August 5 to 8, 2021 in Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada. We decided to postpone the Reunion until August 2022 in Canada. There are currently too many unknowns about border openings and vaccine schedules. Details of the reunion in 2022 will be forthcoming by email and newsletter. In the meantime the Executive Committee Officers will continue in their roles until August 2022.

We also agreed that we will proceed with the Schürch Symposia Series. This will be online Schürch related information about our history and genealogy that will be presented using Zoom technology. Look for the announcement in the April Newsletter.

 

Tom Shirk

President

2 Riverhills Lane, Toledo, Ohio 43623

tomshirk@bex.net

419-346-1811

HOT OFF THE PRESS

The latest issue, November 2020, of the Schürch Family newsletter highlights  Schürchs who moved to California. Excerpts of it can be viewed by clicking here.

New Brubacher House Video

This new video shows the history of the Brubacher House as it relates to the Brubaker Family but the House also has deep Sherk roots. The House was built by John and Magdalena Brubacher. John’s father was Deacon John E Brubacher, Code C346 who was the first male Brubacher immigrant to Waterloo County. John E was the grandson of Maria Sherk Erb, Code C3, and her husband, Christian Erb, immigrants to Waterloo County about 1806.

 

John Brubacher’s mother was Catherine Sherk, Code H464, daughter of Joseph Sherk, Code H46, who was the first immigrant to Waterloo County in 1800.

 

Thus John Brubacher, descendant of John E Brubacher and Catherine Sherk and builder of the Brubacher House can claim two Schurch codes, C3464 and H4644.

At the Schürch Reunion in 2016 in Waterloo Region, this house was one of the stops on a bus tour.

Enjoy the video!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msVJar4UzeI&list=PLRVDwi_WScLnjyYTLm0njOMFG8Dg3AnKB&index=2&t=0s

Reunion 2021 POSTPONED

NEW DATES:

August 4- 7, 2022

Location: Clarion Hotel and Conference Centre

Fort Erie, Ontario

Details of the next reunion will be posted here and on the Reunions pages in the menu as they become available. The newsletter and our Facebook page will also have details.

FREE digital copy of “Table of Contents” and “Every Name Index” based on all newsletters published 1983-2017.

This is a vital resource for researchers and newsletter subscribers. Send your request to  Cary Adams cavalleyboy@earthlink.net and he will email you a pdf version.

How Many Ways can one Spell Schürch?

 

Who are the Schürchs?

 

Well, if your family name or that of any ancestor is Scherich, Scherch, Schirch, Schuerch, Sharick, Sherck, Sherick, Sherk, Sherrick, Shirck, Shirk or any of the more than 70 variants, you are a member of the Family. The Schürch Family originated in Switzerland and through emigration spread to North America in the late 1600s.

Our Swiss-German ancestors spelled their name Schürch and this is still the accepted spelling in Switzerland today. The Swiss also spell it ‘Schuerch’ exchanging the umlaut for the letter ‘e’. Our immigrant forefathers did not speak English and the clerks on the ships at the port of arrival did not usually speak German. Thus in Colonial America and later in the 1800s, various phonetic spellings were adopted. The name of the Family Association uses the Swiss spelling since it is the original surname and is representative of all the various branches of the family in North America today.

The Schürch Family Association of North America (SFANA) was created in 1982 by a group of individuals who were interested in preserving their family heritage. At that time, it was known that at least twenty-five individuals with likely ties to a Schürch family arrived in North America between the years 1727 and 1808. Many of those families (but not all) had ties to Sumiswald, Switzerland. Consequently, a sister organization, Schweizische Gesellschaft für Namenstrager Schürch (SGNS), developed around the same time, with similar goals. This sister organization has compiled extensive documentation on family branches in Switzerland.

The Swiss Schürch Association meets regularly. To learn more of the Schürch Family Association of Switzerland, abbreviated SGNS, visit the Swiss Schürch Family.

SFANA has provided this site to disseminate information about our family and the activities of the Association. Check in on a regular basis to see the latest information on the biennial reunion, research and family happenings.

To learn more of the Schürchs who first landed on North American shores go to Schürch History.

Scharc

Schark
Sharrach
Schearch

Schearck

Scherch

Scherck

Schereck

Scherg
Scherge

Scherich

Scherk

Scherrich

Schirch

Schirck

Schirg

Schirk

Scheorck

Schoerg

Schorch

Schorck

Schorg
Schorock
Schorrock
Sharrich
Shirrock

Schorg

Sherak

Shorck

Schuerch

Schurch

Schurcho

Schurck

Schuerg

Schurg

Schürg

Schurge

Schurger

Schurgh
Schurgo

Schurig

Schuricht
Schurke

Scurean

Scurge

Sharg

Sharick

Sharigh

Shark

Sharrich

Sherak

Shercg

Sherch

Sherck

Shereck

Sherg

Sherich

Sherick

Sherig

Sherk

Sherock

Sherog

Sherrick

Sherrig

Shierk

Shirch

Shirck

Shirg

Shirk

Shirok

Shirrock

Shorck

Shorg

Shork

Shurck

Shurg

Shurixh

Shurk

Sierck

Tscherck

Tsherch

Tsherck

How many? Sixty or more at last count.  Add family surnames with ties to the Schürch family like Bergey, Brubacher, Clemmer, Detweiler, Erb, Good, Hunsberger, Martin, Shantz, and many more and the number of Schürchs skyrockets. In the 37 years since our association was established, Schürch historians have discovered numerous ties connecting the descendants of the first Swiss arrivals in 1727. Come and explore and celebrate your ties to Schürchs in Switzerland and across North America.

 

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